De Chirico strongly influenced the Surrealist movement

De Chirico strongly influenced the Surrealist movement: 

Yves Tanguy wrote how one day in 1922 he saw one of de Chirico's paintings in an art dealer's window, and was so impressed by it he resolved on the spot to become an artist—although he had never even held a brush. Other Surrealists who acknowledged de Chirico's influence include Max ErnstSalvador Dalí, and René Magritte, who described his first sighting of de Chirico's The Song of Love [below] as "one of the most moving moments of my life: my eyes saw thought for the first time."*

 
In November 1919, de Chirico published an article in Valori plastici entitled "The Return of Craftsmanship", in which he advocated a return to traditional methods and iconography.[18] This article heralded an abrupt change in his artistic orientation, as he adopted a classicizing manner inspired by such old masters as Raphael and Signorelli, and became part of the post-war return to order in the arts. He became an outspoken opponent of modern art.

In the early 1920s, the Surrealist writer André Breton discovered one of de Chirico's metaphysical paintings on display in Guillaume's Paris gallery, and was enthralled.[20] Numerous young artists who were similarly affected by de Chirico's imagery became the core of the Paris Surrealist group centered around Breton. In 1924 de Chirico visited Paris and was accepted into the group, although the surrealists were severely critical of his post-metaphysical work.[21]

... His relationship with the Surrealists grew increasingly contentious, as they publicly disparaged his new work; by 1926 he had come to regard them as "cretinous and hostile."[23] They soon parted ways in acrimony.

...
 
The Evil Genius of a King:
 
 
De Chirico's later paintings [below] never received the same critical praise as did those from his metaphysical period. He resented this, as he thought his later work was better and more mature. He nevertheless produced backdated "self-forgeries" both to profit from his earlier success, and as an act of revenge—retribution for the critical preference for his early work.[24] He also denounced many paintings attributed to him in public and private collections as forgeries**.
 
 
1952 piece:
 
*Also during 1922, the poet Marcel Lecomte showed Magritte a reproduction of Giorgio de Chirico's The Song of Love (painted in 1914). The work brought Magritte to tears; he described this as "one of the most moving moments of my life: my eyes saw thought for the first time."
 
**During 1947–48, Magritte's "Vache period," he painted in a provocative and crude Fauve style. During this time, Magritte supported himself through the production of fake Picassos, Braques, and de Chiricos—a fraudulent repertoire he was later to expand into the printing of forged banknotes during the lean postwar period. This venture was undertaken alongside his brother Paul and fellow Surrealist and "surrogate son" Marcel Mariën, to whom had fallen the task of selling the forgeries.[13] At the end of 1948, Magritte returned to the style and themes of his pre-war surrealistic art.
 
 
McCartney owned/owns some Magritte's.
 
The logo of Apple CorpsThe Beatles' company, is inspired by Magritte's Le Jeu de Mourre, a 1966 painting.
 
 
 

Comments